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Moving Process

 

The Moving Process - Quick Guide

1.  Getting Started:

2. Secure a Tru-Pak Move:

  • Guaranteed firm price to eliminate any surprises along the way.
  • One point of contact with an experienced move coordinator.
  • Pre-move planning and strategy for optimal productivity and budget.
  • Guaranteed pickup and delivery dates allow peace of mind.

3.  Getting Ready to Move:

  • Helpful moving and packing tips on our website (below).
  • Boxes and moving supplies available for even the most unique items.
  • Packing and unpacking options accommodate all budget needs.
  • Experienced employees (not contract workers) can professionally pack your belongings utilizing quality packing materials, bubble wrap, furniture pads, stretch wrap and blankets.

4. Moving Process:

  • Belongings are labeled, inventoried and loaded in a systematic process with furniture wrapped in stretch wrap or blankets.
  • Items are safely secured in our trucks with straps for a damage-free delivery!
  • We own all of our trucks and equipment, ensuring a clean, safe and dependable experience.
  • All trucks are driven by experienced and licensed drivers (employees not contract workers) averaging five to 15 years with our company.
  • Storage options for seamless transition.

5. Delivery Day:

  • Belongings are unloaded by the same experienced employees who loaded the truck in 99 percent of circumstances – unheard of in this industry!
  • Items are once again carefully inventoried and then placed in designated rooms.
  • Floor-runners and materials protect the new home during the moving process.
  • Unpacking options allow the most efficient transition into your new home and life.

6. After the Move:

Innovative claims prevention for absolute peace of mind!

Moving Rights & Responsibilities

Before moving your household goods, movers are required by the government to provide you with the booklet, "Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move.”  Download the PDF in English or Spanish: Rights & Responsibilities – ENGLISH or Rights & Responsibilities – SPANISH.

This document provides detailed information that will help you understand all aspects of the moving process, including:

  • What you have a right to expect.
  • What you should do to help ensure that your move is smooth.
  • What the documents detail.
  • Your rights if your household goods are lost or damaged.

For moves in North Carolina, download this PDF: Moving in NC - Rights & Responsibilities.

For Interstate Moves: Ready to Move? - Tips for a Successful Interstate Move.

Protect Yourself From Moving Fraud

With over 40 million families moving each year, the Federal Motor Carrier Administration (FMCSA) of the US Department of Transportation (DOT) has partnered with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and reputable moving organizations and companies, like Tru-Pak, to educate people about the dangers of moving fraud by providing the below brochure.

Please click on the link to download the US government PDF: Protect from Moving Fraud.

Having been in business for over 50 years, Tru-Pak Moving Systems has heard many moving horror stories from customers who lost all their possessions for a deal "too good to be true.” Therefore, take the time to research your moving company, and make sure the moving company you choose is like Tru-Pak Moving Systems:

  • Reputable
  • Experienced
  • Registered
  • Licensed, bonded and insured
  • Members of local, state and national moving organizations, such as AMSA, ProMover and NC Moving Association

Liability Options

There's a lot at stake when you move: You are moving families, treasured possessions, valuable goods and memories.  All of this has a monetary value that needs to be protected. Therefore, it is in your best interest to be aware of the various types of protection required by the federal government and offered by your carrier of choice. This is why the US Department of Transportation has created a valuable guide to identify the liability requirements of all movers. Please click on the link to download Understanding Valuation & Insurance.

Under federal law, interstate movers must offer two different liability options: (1) full value protection and (2) released value:

(1) Full Value Protection - Your mover is liable for the replacement value of lost or damaged goods in your entire shipment. This is the more comprehensive plan available to protect your belongings.

(2) Released Value - Your mover is liable for no more than 60 cents per pound per article. This is the more economical protection plan since it is offered at no additional charge. However, you must sign a specific statement on the bill of lading or contract agreeing to it.

Tru-Pak Moving Systems offers three types of insurance coverage: (1) Limited Liability, (2) Declared Value and (3) Full Replacement Value. On moving day, you must specify your choice:

(1) Limited Liability - This is the basic coverage required by law, and it does not cost the consumer anything. Under limited liability, the mover is responsible for sixty cents ($.60) per pound per item for an interstate move.

(2) Declared Value (depreciated settlement) - You must declare a minimum value of $1.25 per pound (e.g., a 6,000-pound shipment would have a declared value of $7,500). You can also declare a lump-sum value that exceeds $1.25 (i.e., if you believe the above shipment is worth $10,000, you can declare that value since it exceeds $1.25 per pound).

(3) Full Replacement Value (non-depreciated settlement) - You must declare a minimum replacement value of $5,000 or $5.00 per pound times the weight of the shipment (whichever is greater) to qualify for this coverage. You can also declare a lump sum that exceeds $5.00 per pound times the weight of the shipment.

Actions that may limit your mover's liability:

  • Packing perishable, dangerous or hazardous materials in your household goods without your mover's knowledge.
  • Packing your own boxes. If the articles you pack are damaged, it may be more difficult to establish your claim against the mover for boxes you've packed. See our "Packing Tips" section.
  • Choosing the Released Value liability option when your goods are valued at more than 60 cents per pound per article.
  • Failing to notify your mover in writing about articles of extraordinary value before the move.

When so much is at stake, you need to be prepared, which means understanding your rights and responsibilities with respect to liability options. You always cut down on the risk of something going wrong when you use a reputable and experienced moving company like Tru-Pak Moving Systems. You can always contact us with any of your moving or liability questions at 800-659-1233, ext. 210.

Moving Tips

(1) You cannot remember everything! Buy a notebook to keep all of your notes on the move in one place. Go over your notes daily until your move is completed.

(2) Start researching moving companies at least two months before your planned move date, especially if you are moving during the busy spring or fall season. Request a free on-site estimate and get it in writing. Most importantly, make sure the moving company is registered, licensed and reputable, as well as members of local and state moving organizations - like Tru-Pak Moving Systems!

(3) Traveling gear: litter bag, maps, flashlight, toiletries, tissue, packaged snacks and drinks, a good book, book-on-CD, DVD movies, music CDs and chargers for cell phones, laptops, iPads and mp3 players. Bring change for tolls, soda machines, phone calls, etc. Portable DVD players, CD and mp3 players with earphones for kids can be a real blessing!

(4) Give each family member an empty box with their name and the words "FIRST NIGHT" written on it so they have the things they need when they arrive. Give the kids a bag or knapsack to hold their favorite toys, books, CDs, etc., so they feel more comfortable.

Moving Terminology

Moving can be an overwhelming process, but the terminology doesn't have to be! So we've provided the key moving definitions directly from the American Moving & Storage Association's website, http://www.moving.org, and The US Department of Transportation, http://www.protectyourmove.gov.

  • Accessorial (Additional) Services - Services such as packing, unpacking, or shuttle service that you request to be performed (or are necessary because of landlord requirements or other special circumstances). Charges for these services are in addition to the transportation charges.
  • Advanced Charges - Charges for services not performed by the mover but instead by a professional, craftsman or other third party at your request. The charges for these services are paid for by the mover and added to your bill-of-lading charges.
  • Bill of Lading - The receipt for your goods and the contract for their transportation. It is your responsibility to understand the bill of lading before you sign it. If you do not agree with something on the bill of lading, do not sign it until you are satisfied that it is correct. The bill of lading is an important document. Don't lose or misplace your copy.
  • Binding/Non-Binding Estimate - A binding estimate is an agreement made in advance with the mover that guarantees the total cost of the move based on the quantities and services shown on the estimate. A non-binding estimate is the carrier's approximation of the cost based on the estimated weight of the shipment and the accessorial services requested. A non-binding estimate is not binding on the carrier and the final charges will be based on the actual weight and tariff provisions in effect.
  • Extraordinary Value or High Value Article - An article of high or extraordinary value is any item whose value exceeds $100 per pound.
  • Guaranteed Pickup and Delivery Service - An additional level of service whereby dates of service are guaranteed, with the mover providing reimbursement for delays. This premium service is often subject to minimum weight requirements.
  • Hazardous Materials - Explosives, compressed gases, flammable liquids and solids, oxidizers, poisons, corrosives and radioactive materials. Many common household items are considered hazardous materials. These include nail-polish remover, paints, paint thinners, lighter fluid, gasoline, propane cylinders, and automotive repair and maintenance chemicals.
  • High Value Article - items included in a shipment that are valued at more than $100 per pound. These items should be disclosed to the mover to ensure that they are protected accordingly.
  • Interstate Move - A move in which goods are transported from one state to another state.
  • Intrastate Move - A move in which goods are transported from one point to another within the same state; no state borders are crossed.
  • Inventory - The detailed, descriptive list of your household goods showing the number and condition of each item.
  • Tariff - A list of rules, regulations, available services and resulting charges. Each mover publishes its own tariffs and these must be provided to you upon request.
  • Transportation Charges –A charge for the vehicle transportation portion of your move. These charges apply in addition to the additional service charges.
  • Order for Service - The document authorizing the mover to transport your household goods.
  • Pickup and Delivery Charges - Separate transportation charges applicable for transporting your shipment between the warehouse and your residence.
  • Shuttle Service - Use of a smaller vehicle to provide service to residences that are not accessible to the mover's normal line-haul equipment (large moving vans).
  • Storage-In-Transit (SIT) - Temporary warehouse storage of your shipment pending further transportation; for example, if your new home isn't quite ready to occupy. Added charges for SIT service and final delivery charges from the warehouse will apply.
  • Valuation – The degree of "worth" of the shipment. The valuation charge that you are assessed compensates the mover for assuming a greater degree of liability than that provided for in the base transportation charges.

Moving Checklist

While moving is exciting, it's also hectic! The easiest way to ensure a successful move is to plan it carefully. With over 50 years of experience, we've learned a thing or two about moving and love to pass along our knowledge. Here's a step-by-step list to help you plan, organize, pack, move and settle in - as smoothly as possible!

We're always here to help, so if you have any questions, call us at 800-659-1233, ext. 210.

 1. Get the Word Out

There are many people and organizations that need to know you are moving. Items to address include:

  • Mail delivery – Pick up a supply of change-of-address cards at the post office or go online. Fill them out early; they won't become effective until the date you specify. There are certain people you should contact directly so that important information isn't delayed. These include: your employer, the Registry of Motor Vehicles, the draft board, Social Security Office, tax assessors and your medical insurer.
  • Magazine subscription – Most publications need six to eight weeks’ notice. Send them your present address labels along with your new address. Otherwise, you may have to pay postage forwarding.
  • Credit cards – As you pay your bills, look for the space for change of address. If they're contacted early enough, you won't face late charges or extra interest payment later.
  • Utilities – Arrange to have your utilities turned off at the end of your moving day – phone, heat, light and water. Check to see if you have any deposits owed to you. If you rent phone company equipment, make arrangement for its return.
  • Deliveries – Fuel oil, newspaper, milk, diapers, bread and bottled water are some of the items people have delivered. Make sure you cancel them before you leave. Cancel fuel delivery extra early to avoid paying for a supply you may not use.
  • Services – Cable TV, water softener, lawn care and garbage collection. If you have arranged for any of these privately, cancel them before you leave. If it involves equipment, you may be able to save the pickup charge by returning it yourself.
  • Financial institutions – Talk to your bank about closing accounts, transferring funds, and obtaining safety deposit box contents and credit information. Make sure to cancel any direct deposit or automatic payment arrangement on accounts you are closing.
  • School – Telephone your children's schools and find out how they handle record transfers. If you move during the school year, these records could be vital.
  • Medical – Telephone your doctor, dentist and any other healthcare professionals you have visited. Find out if you can take your medical records with you or if they will be transferred directly to your new doctor. At the same time, you may want to renew any existing prescriptions or get referrals to healthcare providers in your new community.
  • Insurance – Let your agent know you are moving. Decide what coverage to keep and what to cancel. Since many homeowners policies are paid ahead of time, you may be eligible for a refund. Make sure the company has your new address to expedite processing.
  • Civic/religious/charitable organizations – If you want to continue your involvement with certain groups, let them know your new address. They may have information on comparable organizations in your new community.
  • Pets – Contact your veterinarian to obtain your pet's records. Now is also a good time to update vaccinations and discuss any concerns you may have about moving your pets.
  • Travel arrangements – If you are going to be driving to your new home, you may want to make hotel reservations ahead of time. If you are to be flying, make reservations early to obtain the flight and fares you want. This is especially important if you are to be traveling with a pet, since there are often restrictions regarding if or when they can be accommodated. While making all your contacts, be sure to collect those things you may have left with friends or neighbors or at local stores. Return borrowed items and retrieve loaned ones. Take books back to the library. And do not forget about clothes at the tailor, dry cleaner or on layaway; shoes at the cobbler; items in storage. It is tough to get things back once you've reached your new home, so do it now.

2. Get Organized

You should not move everything you own. Remember, reduce the weight = reduce the cost.

  • Furniture – Discard anything that is worn out, badly damaged or soon to be replaced. Use a floor-plan sheet to try out different furniture arrangements. Anything that does not fit, like custom-built shelves or cabinets, should probably be left behind. Make sure your furniture will fit through doorways and upstairs. It's better to find out about possible problems now rather than when you arrive at your new home. Think twice about moving sofa beds with iron bed frames and shelving or storage units made from particle board. Make sure they're worth the price to move.
  • Drapes and rugs – Find out the sizes of your new home's windows and floors before you pack drapes and rugs. If they will not fit where you want them, leave them behind. For those you do choose to move, have them cleaned early and leave the wrappings on for extra protection on moving day.
  • Kitchen supplies – High up in the cabinets, at the back of shelves – That is where you are likely to find forgotten items. Do not take it if you do not use it. Use your canned goods and frozen foods now. If you have extra perishables that you cannot use up, consider giving them to a soup kitchen.
  • Clothes – The rule of thumb is that if you have not worn something in two years, you probably never will. That does not mean you should get rid of your wedding dress, but there are probably a lot of other clothes you should discard. If you are moving to a warmer climate, that might apply to most of your winter items. Give the extras away to your local homeless shelter – they will be glad to put them to good use.
  • Outdoor equipment – If swing sets, barbecues, picnic table, lawn mowers and TV antennas are in good shape and you plan to use them in your new home, take them. Otherwise, find out if the new owners or your neighbors are interested in buying them.
  • Other areas – The attic, cellar and garage may well contain items you have not even looked at in years. Consider calling in an antiques expert if you find old furniture or other household items tucked away in those areas. They might be valuable. If you know everything is junk, you might want to contact a rubbish-removal service.

After you finish sorting, take stock of those items you are not going to move. If you give them to a local charity, be sure to get a receipt for tax purposes. If you have many items of decent quality, consider a yard sale. It takes time and effort but can be profitable.

3. Packing Supplies

  • Boxes and ContainersTru-Pak agents have packing containers suited to all your needs, available at a nominal charge.
    • Dish pack – Heavy-duty carton for packing glassware, china, table lamps or similar fragile articles.
    • Wardrobe Carton
    • Wardrobe Bars
    • Mirrors – Small or large.
    • Mattress Carton – For crib, twin, double, king/queen and king single.
    • Mattress Cover – Paper or plastic.
    • Corrugated Containers – Specially designed for mirrors, paintings, glass or marble tops, and similar fragile articles.
    • TV Cartons – For small older televisions up to more modern flat screens.
  • Wrapping MaterialsTru-Pak can supply you with unprinted newspaper stock to avoid ink rubbing off on your possessions.
  • Felt-Tip Markers – Make sure every room has a marking pen.
  • Tape – Wide packing tape, called strapping tape, is the best. Get rolls with their own dispensers to make the job even easier.
  • Scissors – Buy several pairs of inexpensive, sturdy scissors at a hardware store.
  • Sealable Plastic Bags – Small plastic bags can be handy to hold knobs, handles, screws, picture hooks and other easily lost items.

4. Packing Options

A good packing job does more than protect your belongings. It can actually make settling into your new home much easier. Our professional packing crews can handle this backbreaking task with speed and care. Our packing options include:

  • Full-service packing and crating services.
  • Valuable or large items packing and crating.
  • Do-it-yourself packing.
  • Full-service unpacking.
  • If you have decided to do your own packing, read the "Packing Tips" section below or ask your Tru-Pak representative for a brochure on packing.

Tru-Pak Moving Systems has a wide range of packing supplies and specialty box options to accommodate all your valuable, large or odd-shaped items.

5. Basic Packing Rules

  • Valuables – Such as securities, furs, jewelry, coin or stamp collections, computer software and legal papers should NOT go into the moving truck. Take them with you or make arrangements for their shipment by traceable, insurable carrier, such as UPS or Federal Express.  Irreplaceable items that have little insurable value, such as baby pictures or your grandfather's pocket watch, should also travel with you.
  • Flammable toiletries or aerosol containers CANNOT be moved in the van or truck, so throw them out or take them with you.
  • Write on the Box – Before you pack anything, write the room name on all sides of the box and a description of the contents. Incorrect packing is a prime cause of damage. The box should weigh no more than 50 pounds and should not rattle when moved. The sides should not bulge, and the top should close without caving in. Use paper to fill empty spots.
  • Size Matters – The heavier the items, the smaller the box should be. Keep this in mind when you're packing books, DVDs, CDs, tapes, etc. To protect breakable items, do not mix them with heavy items, and cushion them well.
  • Inside the Box – The bottom of each box needs a layer of crumpled paper, with additional cushioning layers in the middle and on top.
  • Fragile items – They can be given extra protection by boxing them individually before packing. Use the "FRAGILE" stickers to mark the outside of appropriate boxes. If a box must be kept right side up, indicate that on the outside with the stickers marked "THIS END UP."
  • New Home Supplies – Before you pack any rooms, take a few boxes and mark them "NEW HOME SUPPLIES." Instead of having to rifle through boxes looking for various things, they will all be in one place. When you find an item for the box, put it in and mark it off the list. You will find your "NEW HOME" boxes to be the most useful ones you pack. 

Here's a basic list of boxes to create:

  • Bedrooms and Bath: sheets, pillows, blankets, shower curtain and hooks, lightweight curtains (not drapes), tension rods, light bulbs, fuses, candles, alarm clock and towels.
  • Toiletries: bar soap, hand soap, shampoo, conditioner, toothbrushes, dental floss, toothpaste and toilet paper.
  • First Aid Kit: aspirin, tweezers, adhesive bandages, antiseptics and prescriptions.
  • Household/Kitchen Supplies: can opener, paper cups, plates, utensils, trash bags, paper towels, dish towels, dust pan, broom, all-purpose cleaner, sponges, dishwashing soap, hand soap and coffeemaker.
  • Tools: flashlight, hammer, pliers, screwdriver, wrench, scissors, utility knife, thumbtacks, nails and screws.
  • Personal: change of clothes for every person, baby supplies and pet supplies

6. Packing Each Room

  • The Kitchen – Since this is the busiest room in the house, it is usually packed last. Gather all of your dishtowels and pot holders to use for extra padding. We strongly recommend the purchase of special cartons designed to protect dishes. Pack plates standing on their edges – never flat. Nest bowls, cups and glasses after wrapping. Be sure to fill any empty spaces with appropriate packing material. Think twice before you move any opened food containers. With spices and grains, consider their age. If they are a year or more old, do not take them. If you must take opened containers, tape them shut securely and enclose in plastic bags.
  • Appliances – Appliances should be clean, dry and disconnected for moving day. Defrost and air freezers and refrigerators and contact the gas company to disconnect any gas appliances. You are responsible for the actual disconnecting and reconnecting of all appliances. Put appliance operating instructions in your special file or tape them to the inside of the appliance. Otherwise, they could easily be misplaced.
  • The Dining Room – Delicate crystal, china and bric-a-brac need extra protection. Consider boxing some things up before putting them in packing containers. If you seal napkins and tablecloths in plastic bags, you can use them for additional padding. Make sure everything is snug, and mark the boxes "FRAGILE." If you have fine silver, avoid discolorations by making sure it's clean and don't wrap it with rubber bands. If you have a case for it, fill in all the empty spaces with soft cloth or tissue, seal it shut with wrapping paper and tape, and then wrap it in toweling. Otherwise, wrap each piece in soft cloth or special silver paper before packing. This will protect it from tarnish and scratches.
  • The Family Room – Mirrors and framed pictures need to be packed in special cartons available from your Tru-Pak agent. Lamps should be taken apart, bulbs removed, and the shade wrapped carefully and boxed. Use the right size box, and don't use newspaper for packing. Use as little paper as possible to avoid denting. Dried flower arrangements should get the same treatment as lamp shades, and make sure to label the boxes with "THIS END UP" stickers.
  • Electronic equipment – This should be moved in its original packing cartons when available. Secure all parts prior to packing. If you are moving in the summer, certain items can be damaged by the heat, such as candles, DVDs, CDs, records, tapes and floppy disks. Consider taking them yourself, or shipping them in a way that will reduce transit time.
  • The Bedroom – Clothing can either be folded and packed or hung in wardrobe "closets" available from your Tru-Pak agent. Dresser drawers may be packed with lightweight clothing, but be sure to remove any liquids or breakable items first. Strip beds completely but leave them assembled. They will be dismantled by the moving crews and reassembled at your new home. If you have a water bed, empty it the day before you move.
  • ** Flammable toiletries or aerosol containers cannot be moved in the van or truck, so throw them out or take them with you.
  • Storage Areas – Before you move anything that has been in a storage area, clean it well and make sure it is in sound condition. Drain garden hoses and empty and wash any plant containers or garden equipment using soap and water. You do not want to risk moving insects or disease.  Gasoline-powered equipment, such as lawn mowers, motorcycles or snow blowers must be emptied of all fuel and oil a few days before the move to ensure complete evaporation. Propane tanks also must be purged.
  • Unmovable Items – By law, there are some items van lines are not allowed to move, so be sure you do not pack them. You may take some of them yourself, while others should be thrown away. Check local disposal ordinances first; there are now stringent regulations on many substances. Flammable, explosives and corrosives, ammunition and firearms, fireworks or flares, gasoline, kerosene, motor fuel and lamp oil, oil-based paints, thinners and varnishes, lighter or starter fluid, fire extinguishers, nail-polish remover, bleach, fuel, aerosol cans and matches cannot be transported

7. Moving Out Day

Moving day is always hectic. There are those last few items that did not get packed, those last few calls that need to be made. If you have young children (or pets) that might not be able to stay out of the movers’ way, see if you can leave them with family, friends or neighbors. That lets everybody concentrate on the move without worrying about injuries.

  • Movers Arrive – When your Tru-Pak crew arrives, take them through the house. Point out any items not to be moved and those designated "NEW HOME SUPPLIES." Make sure any boxes not to be moved are clearly marked. Your driver will tag items and note their condition on an inventory sheet, which you have to sign.
  • Inventory Sheet – This inventory sheet is critical, so take the time to read it carefully. Make sure everything is on the list and that you understand and agree with any notations concerning pre-existing damage to your belongings. Be sure to note it on the inventory sheet if you do not agree and initial your comment.
  • Bill of Lading – Along with the inventory sheet, check over the bill of lading, especially the insurance or declared value section, and make sure they are filled out correctly before you sign them. Keep copies of these papers with you in a safe and accessible place; you must have them with you when the van arrives at your new home. At the same time, double-check your payment arrangements.
  • Payment Options  –  Personal checks cannot be accepted, so plan ahead to have cash, a certified check or money order ready. On interstate moves, Tru-Pak is happy to accept most major credit cards. Before the Tru-Pak crew leaves, make sure the driver has the correct address of your new home, as well as a phone number where he/she can reach you or leave a message. If your plans change after the crew has left, contact Tru-Pak immediately. We will do our best to accommodate your schedule. As you get ready to leave, walk through the house one last time to make sure nothing has been left behind. Turn off the lights, turn down the heat, lock all doors and windows, and leave your name, address and phone numbers for the new owners. That way they can call you if they have any questions, and you will be sure to get any mail the post office misses.

8. Moving-In Day - You've Arrived!

The first day in a new home can be chaotic; that is to be expected. The Tru-Pak crew will do their best to keep things running smoothly, but they need your help. Try to keep your children occupied and out of the line of traffic for their safety. If you have a pet, put it in an isolated room with food, water and bedding. Post a note on the door to remind everybody to keep this door closed.

  • Payment – When the moving van pulls up to your new home, the Tru-Pak moving crew will be ready to go, but the moving charges must be paid before they can begin to unload.
  • House Tour – You should take the crew on a tour through the house, showing them the designated rooms for the boxes.
  • Mark Rooms – It is helpful to put a note on each door, "SUE'S BEDROOM," "STUDY," etc., so the boxes you marked will end up where they belong. Let the movers know exactly where you want things; they'll be happy to oblige.
  • Inventory Sheet – As the movers begin to take furniture and boxes off the truck, stay nearby with your inventory sheet. Check off each item as it is unloaded, and be sure to note any damage. If anything is missing, note that, too. Once everything has been moved, go over the inventory list with the movers. If anything is missing or damaged, contact us immediately at 800-659-1233 and we will send out the necessary forms so your claim can be processed quickly, or see the "The Moving Process - After the Move" section above to download the forms now.

9. Settling In

  • Once the movers have left, it is easy to feel overwhelmed. Open your "NEW HOME SUPPLIES" boxes and start with the easy jobs. Put toilet paper in the bathrooms, paper cups by the sink and trash bags in every room. Put light bulbs in the most important fixtures, and hang up your shower curtain. If you have packed curtains and tension rods, hang them in the bedroom windows. If you did not bring curtains, slide a tension rod through the top hemp of any sheet; it will at least provide temporary privacy. If you have a pet, make sure all doors and windows are closed before you let it explore the house. Do not take it out without a leash until you have checked your yard for hidden exits such as holes dug under the fence or spaces where a post is missing.
  • Although you will want to get some basic food supplies right away, there is no need to start cooking meals immediately. Give yourself the chance to relax and recognize that you cannot do everything at once.
  • Remember, it takes a while to settle into a new home. If you first take care of the kitchen, bedrooms and bathrooms, things will be easier. Keep going back to your "NEW HOME SUPPLIES" boxes. You will find most of the tools and equipment you will need to get the house in order. Try new furniture arrangements, but do not hang up pictures and mirrors right away. Otherwise, you'll have holes in your walls if you change your mind.
  • Take the time to get to know your neighborhood and your neighbors. Slowly but surely, all of the boxes will be unpacked and everything will be put away. Within a few weeks, your new house will be a home!

**Remember, your Tru-Pak representative is available to answer questions and offer assistance throughout the entire moving process. Just pick up the phone and give us a call.

Packing Tips

1. Do NOT Pack These Items

Here's a partial list of items to leave out of your moving boxes. This is important for the safety and security of everyone involved - you too! Please be responsible when disposing of these items. Contact us with any questions at 1-800-659-1233, ext. 210. 

  • Ammunition.
  • Bleach.
  • Disinfectant cleaners (especially those containing bleach or ammonia).
  • House paints.
  • Antifreeze.
  • Propane tanks or cans.
  • Welding gas.
  • Gas or oils.
  • Fire extinguishers.
  • Butane.
  • Aerosols.
  • Open alcohol containers.
  • Open containers of liquid.
  • Open or non-sealed food containers.
  • Perishable foods.
  • Items with excessive odor.

2. Valuable Items

Valuable items, such as securities, furs, jewelry, coin or stamp collections, computer software and legal papers should NOT go into the moving van or truck. Take them with you or make arrangements for their shipment by traceable, insurable carrier, such as UPS or Federal Express. Irreplaceable items that have little insurable value, such as baby pictures or your grandfather's pocket watch, should also travel with you.

3. Fragile items

They can be given extra protection by boxing them individually before packing. Use the "FRAGILE" stickers to mark the outside of appropriate boxes. If a box must be kept right side up, indicate that on the outside with the stickers marked "THIS END UP."

4. Size Matters

The heavier the items, the smaller the box should be. Keep this in mind when you're packing books, DVDs, CDs, tapes, etc. To protect breakable items, do not mix them with heavy items, and be sure to cushion them well.

5. Mark Each Box

Before you pack anything, write the room name on all sides of the box along with a description of the contents. Incorrect packing is a prime cause of damage. The box should weigh no more than 50 pounds and should not rattle when moved. The sides should not bulge, and the top should close without caving in. Use paper to fill empty spots.

6. Create Basic Supply Boxes

Before you pack any rooms, take a few boxes and mark them "NEW HOME SUPPLIES." Instead of having to rifle through boxes looking for various things, they will all be in one place. When you find an item for the box, put it in and mark it off the list. You will find your "NEW HOME BOXES" to be the most useful ones you pack. Here's a basic list of boxes to create:

  • Bedrooms and Bath: sheets, pillows, blankets, shower curtain and hooks, lightweight curtains (not drapes), tension rods, light bulbs, fuses, candles, alarm clock and towels.
  • Toiletries: bar soap, hand soap, shampoo, conditioner, toothbrushes, dental floss, toothpaste and toilet paper.
  • First aid kit: aspirin, tweezers, adhesive bandages, antiseptics and prescriptions.
  • Household/Kitchen supplies: bottle/can opener, paper/plastic cups, plates, utensils, trash bags, paper towels, dishtowels, dust pan, broom, all-purpose cleaning spray, sponges, dishwashing soap, hand soap/disinfectant, coffee maker and tea maker.
  • Tools: flashlight, hammer, pliers, screwdriver, wrench, scissors, utility knife, thumbtacks, nails and screws.
  • Personal: change of clothes for every person, baby supplies and pet supplies.

7. Basic Packing Supplies

  • Boxes and containersTru-Pak agents have packing containers suited to all your needs, available at a nominal charge.
    • Dish pack – Heavy duty carton for packing glassware, china, table lamps or similar fragile articles.
    • Wardrobe carton
    • Wardrobe bars
    • Mirrors – Small or large.
    • Mattress carton – for crib, twin, double, king/queen and king single.
    • Mattress cover – Paper or plastic.
    • Corrugated containers – Specially designed for mirrors, paintings, glass or marble tops, and similar fragile articles.
    • TV cartons –  For small older televisions up to more modern flat screens
  • Wrapping materialsTru-Pak can supply you with unprinted newspaper stock to avoid ink rubbing off on your possessions.
  • Felt-tip markers – Make sure every room has a marking pen.
  • Tape – Wide packing tape, called strapping tape, is the best. Get rolls with their own dispensers to make the job even easier.
  • Scissors – Buy several pairs of inexpensive, sturdy scissors at a hardware store.
  • Sealable plastic bags – Small plastic bags can be handy to hold knobs, handles, screws, picture hooks, and other easily lost items.

8. Packing Options

A good packing job does more than protect your belongings. It can actually make settling into your new home much easier. Our professional packing crews can handle this backbreaking task with speed and care. Our packing options include:

  • Full-service packing and crating services.
  • Valuable or large items packing and crating.
  • Do-it-yourself packing.
  • Full-service unpacking.

If you have decided to do your own packing, read the "Packing Tips" section below or ask your Tru-Pak representative for a brochure on packing.

Tru-Pak Moving Systems has a wide range of packing supplies and specialty box options to accommodate all your valuable, large or odd-shaped items.

9. Basic Packing Rules

  • Valuables – Items with great value, such as securities, furs, jewelry, coin or stamp collections, computer software and legal papers, should NOT go into the moving truck. Take them with you or make arrangements for their shipment by traceable, insurable carrier, such as UPS or Federal Express.  Irreplaceable items that have little insurable value, such as baby pictures or your grandfather's pocket watch, should also travel with you.
    • ** Flammable toiletries or aerosol containers CANNOT be moved in the van or truck, so throw them out or take them with you.
  • Write on the box – Before you pack anything, write the room name on all sides of the box along with a description of the contents. Incorrect packing is a prime cause of damage. The box should weigh no more than 50 pounds and should not rattle when moved. The sides should not bulge, and the top should close without caving in. Use paper to fill empty spots.
  • Size Matters – The heavier the items, the smaller the box should be. Keep this in mind when you're packing books, DVDs, CDs, tapes, etc. To protect breakable items, do not mix them with heavy items, and cushion them well.
  • Inside the box – The bottom of each box needs a layer of crumpled paper, with additional cushioning layers in the middle and on top.
  • Fragile items – They can be given extra protection by boxing them individually before packing. Use the "FRAGILE" stickers to mark the outside of appropriate boxes. If a box must be kept right side up, indicate that on the outside with the stickers marked "THIS END UP.”
  • New home supplies – Before you pack any rooms, take a few boxes and mark them "NEW HOME SUPPLIES." Instead of having to rifle through boxes looking for various things, they will all be in one place. When you find an item for the box, put it in and mark it off the list. You will find your "NEW HOME" boxes to be the most useful ones you pack.  Here's a basic list of boxes to create:
    • Bedrooms and Bath: sheets, pillows, blankets, shower curtain and hooks, lightweight curtains (not drapes), tension rods, light bulbs, fuses, candles, alarm clock and towels.
    • Toiletries: bar soap, hand soap, shampoo, conditioner, toothbrushes, dental floss, toothpaste and toilet paper.
    • First aid kit: aspirin, tweezers, adhesive bandages, antiseptics and prescriptions.
    • Household/kitchen supplies: can opener, paper cups, plates, utensils, trash bags, paper towels, dish towels, dust pan, broom, all-purpose cleaner, sponges, dishwashing soap, hand soap and coffeemaker.
    • Tools: flashlight, hammer, pliers, screwdriver, wrench, scissors, utility knife, thumbtacks, nails and screws.
    • Personal: change of clothes for every person, baby supplies and pet supplies.

10. Packing Each Room

  • Kitchen – Since this is the busiest room in the house, it is usually packed last. Gather all of your dishtowels and pot holders to use for extra padding. We strongly recommend the purchase of special cartons designed to protect dishes. Pack plates standing on their edges – never flat. Nest bowls, cups and glasses after wrapping. Be sure to fill any empty spaces with appropriate packing material. Think twice before you move any opened food containers. With spices and grains, consider their age. If they are a year or more old, do not take them. If you must take opened containers, tape them shut securely and enclose in plastic bags.
  • Appliances – Appliances should be clean, dry and disconnected for moving day. Defrost and air freezers and refrigerators, and contact the gas company to disconnect any gas appliances. You are responsible for the actual disconnecting and reconnecting of all appliances. Put appliance operating instructions in your special file or tape them to the inside of the appliance. Otherwise, they could easily be misplaced.
  • Dining room – Delicate crystal, china and bric-a-brac need extra protection. Consider boxing some things up before putting them in packing containers. If you seal napkins and tablecloths in plastic bags, you can use them for additional padding. Make sure everything is snug, and mark the boxes "FRAGILE." If you have fine silver, avoid discolorations by making sure it's clean and don't wrap it with rubber bands. If you have a case for it, fill in all the empty spaces with soft cloth or tissue, seal it shut with wrapping paper and tape, and then wrap it in toweling. Otherwise, wrap each piece in soft cloth or special silver paper before packing. This will protect it from tarnish and scratches.
  • Family room – Mirrors and framed pictures need to be packing in special cartons available from your Tru-Pak agent. Lamps should be taken apart, bulbs removed, and the shade wrapped carefully and boxed. Use the right size box and don't use newspaper for packing. Use as little paper as possible to avoid denting. Dried flower arrangements should get the same treatment as lamp shades, and make sure to label the boxes with "THIS END UP" stickers.
  • Electronic equipment – should be moved in its original packing cartons when available. Secure all parts prior to packing. If you are moving in the summer, certain items can be damaged by the heat, such as candles, DVDs, CDs, records, tapes and floppy disks. Consider taking them yourself, or shipping them in a way that will reduce transit time.
  • Computer – To ensure your computer is transported safely, follow these important steps: (1) back up your data; (2) prepare your hard drive; (3) secure your computer; and (4) secure your printer:
    • Back up your Data – Be sure to back up your important files and programs. Store the backup disks or drives with your original program disks in a secure container. Also remember to remove any disks from the drives.
    • Prepare your hard drive – To avoid shock to your hard drive, the recording heads should be "parked" before transport. To find your computer's park procedure program, check the diagnostic disk that came with your computer.
    • Secure your computer – If you still have it, use your computer system's original packing box, including the rigid Styrofoam packing material. If you've misplaced it, Tru-Pak Moving Systems can provide you with a sturdy packing container and materials appropriate for the safe transport of your computer.
    • Secure your printer – Use your printer's original packing box, including the Styrofoam packing material, if you still have it. Otherwise, Tru-Pak Moving Systems can provide an appropriate container and packing materials. Remove ink cartridges to prevent spillage and secure in sealable bags.
  • Bedroom – Clothing can either be folded and packed or hung in wardrobe "closets" available from your Tru-Pak agent. Dresser drawers may be packed with lightweight clothing, but be sure to remove any liquids or breakable items first. Strip beds completely but leave them assembled. They will be dismantled by the moving crews and reassembled at your new home. If you have a water bed, empty it the day before you move.
    • ** Flammable toiletries or aerosol containers cannot be moved in the van or truck, so throw them out or take them with you.
  • Storage areas – Before you move anything that has been in a storage area, clean it well and make sure it is in sound condition. Drain garden hoses and empty and wash any plant containers or garden equipment using soap and water. You do not want to risk moving insects or disease.  Gasoline-powered equipment, such as lawn mowers, motorcycles or snow blowers must be emptied of all fuel and oil a few days before the move to ensure complete evaporation. Propane tanks also must be purged.
  • Unmovable items – By law, there are some items van lines are not allowed to move, so be sure you do not pack them. You may take some of them yourself, while others should be thrown away. Check local disposal ordinances first; there are now stringent regulations on many substances. Flammables, explosives and corrosives, ammunition and firearms, fireworks or flares, gasoline, kerosene, motor fuel and lamp oil, oil based paints, thinners and varnishes, light or starter fluid, fire extinguishers, nail-polish remover, bleach, fuel, aerosol cans and matches cannot be transported.

FAQ

We know that moving can be an overwhelming process, so here are some of the most asked questions garnered from our 50 years of moving experience. If your question has not been answered, just call us toll-free at 800-659-1233, ext. 210.

Are there items I should avoid packing?

Some common household products can be dangerous when packed and shipped in a moving van. Flammable items and aerosol products can trigger fire and explosions that can destroy your property. To ensure a safe move, never pack the following:

  • Aerosol cans
  • Cleaning products
  • Insecticides
  • Hairspray
  • Oil-based paint and paint thinner
  • Gasoline and kerosene
  • Bleach
  • Chlorine granules or powder
  • Muriatic acid
  • Auto batteries
  • Propane tanks
  • Oxygen tanks
  • Lighter fluid
  • Matches
  • Ammunition

What are my insurance options?

Tru-Pak Moving Systems offers three types of insurance coverage: Limited Liability, Declared Value and Full-Replacement Value. On moving day, you must specify your choice.

  • Limited Liability - This is the basic coverage required by law, and it does not cost the consumer anything. Under limited liability, the over is responsible for sixty cents ($.60) per pound per item for an interstate move.
  • Declared Value (depreciated settlement) - You must declare a minimum value of $1.25 per pound (e.g., a 6,000-pound shipment would have a declared value of $7,500). You can also declare a lump-sum value that exceeds $1.25 (i.e., if you believe the above shipment is worth $10,000, you can declare that value since it exceeds $1.25 per pound).
  • Full-Replacement Value (non-depreciated settlement) - you must declare a minimum replacement value of $5,000 or $5.00 per pound times the weight of the shipment (whichever is greater) to qualify for this coverage. You can also declare a lump sum that exceeds $5.00 per pound times the weight of the shipment.

How should I pack my computer?

To ensure your computer is transported safely, follow these important steps: (1) back up your data; (2) prepare your hard drive; (3) secure your computer; and (4) secure your printer.

(1) Back up your data - Be sure to back up your important files and programs. Store the backup disks with your original program disks, and keep them in a secure container. Remove any disks from the drives.

(2) Prepare your hard drive - To avoid shock to your hard drive, the recording heads should be "parked" before transport. To find your computer's park procedure program, check the diagnostic disk that came with your computer.

(3) Secure your computer - If you still have it, use your computer system's original packing box, including the rigid Styrofoam packing material. If you've misplaced or lost the original box, Tru-Pak can provide you with a sturdy packing container and materials appropriate for the safe transport of your computer.

(4) Secure your printer - Use your printer's original packing box, including the Styrofoam packing material, if you still have it. Otherwise, Tru-Pak can provide an appropriate container and packing materials. Remove ink cartridges to prevent spillage.

What packing materials do I need?

For a nominal fee, Tru-Pak can provide boxes and wrapping material suited to all your needs. We have specialized boxes in several sizes to fit valuable or specific items, such as:

  • Dish pack – Heavy-duty carton for packing glassware, china, table lamps or similar fragile articles.
  • Wardrobe cartons.
  • Wardrobe bars.
  • Mirror boxes.
  • Mattress carton.
  • Mattress cover.
  • Corrugated containers.
  • TV cartons - many sizes for conventional TVs, as well as flat-screen TVs.
  • Strong boxes and containers use corrugated cardboard. Be sure to pack clothing in wardrobe boxes to cut down on post-move ironing.
  • Use discarded newspaper, bubble wrap and packing peanuts to protect breakable items.
  • Use a bold marker to label every box you pack. Boxes containing breakable items should be labeled "FRAGILE."
  • Use wide packing tape, also called strapping tape. For optimum convenience, get rolls with their own dispensers.
  • Use sealable plastic bags for storing knobs, handles, screws, picture hooks and other small items.

Should I pack my valuables, such as jewelry and legal papers?

Your most valuable possessions (fine art, jewelry, furs, coin and stamp collections, securities, photographs, heirlooms and legal papers) should NOT go in the moving van or truck. Take them with you or make arrangements for their shipment by a traceable, insurable carrier, such as UPS or Federal Express.

Can I deduct moving expenses?

In most cases your moving expenses are deductible from your federal income taxes. If you moved due to a change in your job or business location, or because you started a new job or business, you maybe be able to deduct your "reasonable" moving expenses.

To qualify, you must satisfy two tests: (1) distance test and (2) time test:

(1) Distance test - your new job must be at least 50 miles farther from your old home than your old job location was from your old home. If you had no previous workplace, your new job must be at least 50 miles from your old home.

(2) Time test – If you are an employee, you must work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months right after you arrive in the general area of your new job. If you are self-employed, you must work full-time for at least 39 weeks during the first 12 months and for a total of at least 78 weeks during the first 24 months after you arrive in the general area of your new work location. There are exceptions to the time test in case of death, disability, and involuntary separation, among other things.

If you are a member of the armed forces, and your move was due to a permanent change of station, you do not have to satisfy the distance or time test.

"Reasonable expenses," according to the IRS, include the cost of packing and transporting your goods and effects, the cost of storage and insurance on these items, and the cost of connecting and disconnecting utilities while moving household goods and personal effects. As for traveling to the new home, reasonable expenses are the cost of lodging and transportation from the old house to the new house.

Meals are not deductible as an expense. Also, pre-move house-hunting expenses and entering into or breaking a lease are not deductible.

Moving expenses are figured on Form 3903 and deducted as an adjustment to income on Form 1040. You cannot deduct any moving expenses that were reimbursed by your employer. For more information, visit this link at the IRS.

What if I need to reschedule or cancel a move?

Contact us within 24 hours of your scheduled move, and we would be happy to accommodate you.

Where can I find out whether a mover is registered with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)?

http://fmcsa-li.volpe.dot.gov or call 1-202-366-9805

Helpful Links

We've scoured the internet to give you the most comprehensive list of super helpful links so you can focus on beginning your new chapter with just a click of the mouse (probably several clicks, but at least they're all on the same page!).

Moving Fraud Prevention

MovingScam.com - A consumer advocacy website including accounts of moving scams and how to avoid them.

Telecommunications

AT&T Phone Service - Current AT&T residential customers can use an online service to transfer existing services to their new homes.

Cities

City-Data.com - Diverse collection of city data, including highest income, least crime, newest houses, most females, shortest commute, best educated residents and more...

Employment

CareerOneStep - Explore important info about employment outlook, industry trends, training requirements and salary structure for many career fields.

CareerMosaic - One of the largest online job sites, you can safely search by location, industry, salary range, etc.

JobBank USA - Specializing in providing career information, including job and resume database services to job candidates, employers and recruitment firms in the US and worldwide.

Monster - One of the largest online job sites. Hundreds of thousands of postings can be sorted through by using a search engine to tailor to your wish list.

Voting

Voting After You Move: A Guide - A 50-state resource for registering to vote.

International Relocation

CIA Word Fact Book - Maps, economic, communication and transportation information as well as other useful tidbits.

The Electronic Embassy - Information on all of the foreign embassies of Washington D.C. forms the core of the electronic embassy.

Real Estate and Mortgages

HomeFair.com - A comprehensive page filled with information on real estate, mortgages, cities and other useful tips.

National Association of Home Builders - NAHB has assembled a wide variety of for-consumers materials and information regularly, so remember to come back often!

Realtor.com - Information on how to get started looking for a home, buying, selling, making an offer and closing the deal.

Apartment Search.com - Relocation information with apartment dwellers in mind.

Salary Calculator - Calculate relative salaries between cities.

Other Sites of Interest

1StopMove - Your one-stop change-of-address service.

Elder Care - Elder Web is an online sourcebook with over 4,000 reviewed links to information about health, financing, housing, aging and other issues related to the care of the frail and elderly.